Month: November 2013

harare zimbabwe: d’bi.young anitafrika among the collective of female artistes tackle gender-based violence in human rights festival

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TAWANDA MUDZONGA, OWN CORRESPONDENT  •  28 NOVEMBER 2013

HARARE – Sistaz Open Mic, a platform for female artistes to express themselves, will return to the Book Café on Saturday as part of commemorations of 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence.

The special event created and designed under Pamberi Trust’s Flame (Female Literary Arts and Music Enterprise) programme has been running since 2007.

Saturday’s edition of Sistaz Open Mic is a vital opportunity for female artistes to enlighten others about gender-based violence.

Performances from Cynthia Mare, Were, African Pride, Maria Vera Chisvo, Tendai Mavengeni and Caroleen Masawi have been lined up  to delight the audience.

These rising stars will be supported by established acts such as singer Cindy Munyavi, poet Roxanne ‘Xapa’ Mathazia and drummer Rumbidzai Tapfuma.

Dynamic vocalist Tina Watyoka will be the closing act of the programme that will be overseen by talented vocalist Clare Nyakujara who will be the master of ceremonies.

Sistaz Open Mic owes its success to a vibrant mentoring programme of upcoming young talent that has been overseen by established artistes such as Tariro neGitare, Dudu Manhenga and Clare Nyakujara.

Sistaz Open Mic will be followed at 5:30pm by the premiere screening of the music video How to Dance, a song written and composed by Netherlands-based Zimbabwe talent, Rina Mushonga in commemoration of World Aids Day, which will be celebrated on December 1.

The song, a heartfelt ode to those affected by HIV/Aids, features the talents of Rina Mushonga and her band the Zimfellas, Edith weUtonga, Ammara Brown, Dizzy Don, Blackbird, Mokoomba, Ba Shupi and the Arundel School Choir.

The Book Café has an exciting line-up all of next week, featuring workshops, poetry, film screenings and performance by international dub poet D’bi Young.

The Jamaican/Canadian talent is visiting Zimbabwe for the second time where she will share with audiences her unique brand of storytelling using “dup poetry”, a Caribbean tradition of chanting poetry over dub/reggae rhythms.

The celebrated poet is also a playwright, gender activist and educator, and the Book Café is excited to have her as an integral part of the 16 Days arts programming courtesy of Pamberi Trust.

Tonight the Book Café is hosting a discussion entitled, “Gender and Disability”, bringing to the fore how physically challenged women are affected by gender-based violence.

The discussion will feature UNWTO brand ambassador and prominent disability activist Soneni Gwizi and top lawyer Thabani Mpofu who will explain disability and gender-based violence from a constitutional perspective.

The third panellist, Jennifer Shumba will further add her personal perspective on disability and gender-based violence.

The discussion, presented by arts organisation Pamberi Trust in conjunction with Signs of Hope Trust, will be chaired by Admire Zaya.

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the herald: Zimbabwe – Jamaican Poet to Grace ’16 Days’ Campaign

zim fest

CELEBRATED Jamaican dub poet D’BI Young is expected to grace this year’s “16 Days of Activism Against Violence Against Women” campaign scheduled for the Book Cafe early next month. D’Bi Young will also be one of the guest speakers at a gender forum discussion on December 5 chaired by Cynthia “Flowchyld” Marangwanda while Mandisa Mabuthoe from Botswana and Roxy “Xapa” Mathazia from Zimbabwe are guest speakers.

The internationally celebrated D’BI Young is a mono-dramatist and educator whose socially-conscious and highly dynamic performance and art works have made a significant mark upon the global psyche.

D’bi Young believes in “life, love and revolution”. Raised in Kingston, Jamaica, she moved to Canada in 1993, and exploded onto the Canadian theatre scene in 2001. She has since written eight plays, authored two poetry collections, produced two dub albums and received six Canadian awards for her work.

Her work has been extensively anthologised, featured on television from Cuba to Canada, and produced in theatres across North America, Africa, the Caribbean and Europe. D’BI is celebrated as a visionary storyteller, a passionate humanist and a leader in the development of arts education.

This is her second visit to Zimbabwe after passing through the capital in 2012 with the Poetry Africa Tour — and vowing to return.

As with previous years, the Book Café in Harare once again joins the world with a series of vivid and colourful events to raise awareness of the campaign in Zimbabwe, and to promote non-violence through the powerful voices of women and men in the arts.

Against the backdrop of the global theme: “From Peace in the Home to Peace in World” Harare arts organisation Pamberi Trust will roll out 16 events at the Book Café, featuring some of Zimbabwe’s top and up-and-coming performing artistes in music and poetry performances, workshops, discussions and film-screenings beginning today until December 7 .

“Performers to look forward to include Dudu Manhenga, Clare Nyakujara and Uza in ‘3Generations'; Victor Kunonga and Peace; Diana Samkange, Edith weUtonga and Fatima Katiji, Ammara Brown and Kessia Masona,” said Penny Yon of Pamberi Trust.

The horrific slaughter of women students at a Canadian college in 1989 sparked global protest and a powerful worldwide campaign. The slaughter came to be known as the “Montreal Massacre”.

The campaign is known as “16 Days of Activism Against Gender Based Violence”, and advocates for awareness and action on the multi-faceted intersections of gender-based violence and militarism, while highlighting the connection between the struggle for economic and social rights and ending gender-based violence across the world.

Pamberi Trust’s gender project FLAME works to bring women artistes into the mainstream of the arts in Zimbabwe.

It is the continuing aim of the project to provide women artistes with opportunities for promotion, and – through these popular opinion leaders and new performance opportunities – to use the arts and civil society for the promotion of peace and nation-building.

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d’bi. headlines wombanist festival in zimbabwe – 16 days of activism against gender violence

D'BI.YOUNG in Zim_POSTER 16 DAYS PROG PO (2)

PRESS RELEASE: Immediate release

Book Café presents 15 events for ‘16 Days’

The worldwide campaign against gender-based violence

Book Café, Harare, 25 Nov-07 Dec 2013

139 S.Machel Ave/6th St, Harare

The horrific slaughter of women students at a Canadian college in 1989 sparked global protest and a powerful worldwide campaign.  The slaughter came to be known as the ‘Montreal Massacre’.  The campaign is known as ‘16 Days of Activism against Gender Based Violence’, and advocates for awareness and action on the multi-faceted intersections of gender-based violence and militarism, while highlighting the connection between the struggle for economic and social rights and ending gender-based violence across the world.

This November The Book Café in Harare once again joins the world with a series of vivid and colourful events to raise awareness of the campaign in Zimbabwe, and to promote non-violence through the powerful voices of women and men in the arts.

Against the backdrop of the global theme “From Peace in the Home to Peace in World” Harare arts organisation Pamberi Trust will roll out 15 events at the Book Café, featuring some of Zimbabwe’s top and up-and-coming performing artists in music and poetry performances, workshops, discussions and film-screenings, from 25 November to 7 December 2013.

Performers to look forward to include Dudu Manhenga, Clare Nyakujara and Uza in ‘3Generations’;  Victor Kunonga & Peace; Diana Samkange, Edith weUtonga and Fatima Katiji, Ammara Brown and Kessia Masona.

The headline act of the 2013 campaign is D’BI.YOUNG ANITAFRIKA - the internationally celebrated Jamaican dubpoet, monodramatist and educator whose socially-conscious and highly dynamic performance and art works have made a significant mark upon the global psyche. D’bi.Young believes in “life, love and r/evolution”.  Raised in Kingston, Jamaica, she moved to Canada in 1993, and exploded onto the Canadian theatre scene in 2001.  She has since written 8 plays, authored 2 poetry collections, produced two dub albums and received 6 Canadian awards for her work. (http://www.dbi333.com/).  Her work has been extensively anthologized, featured on television from Cuba to Canada, and produced in theatres across North America, Africa, the Caribbean and Europe.  D’bi. is celebrated as a visionary storyteller, a passionate humanist and a leader in the development of arts education.  This is her second visit to Zimbabwe after passing through the capital in 2012 with the Poetry Africa Tour – and vowing to return.

D’BI.YOUNG will join Zimbabwean women artists in workshops, a public discussion “The Art(is)t Shaman: Sitting at the crossroads of the personal, the political, and the spiritual in Black Womben’s Art”, and performances including the 16 Days Human Rights Concert on Saturday 7 December.

Poets from all over will delight fans of the spoken-word, and visitors are expected from neighbouring countries also.

The ‘16 Days’ Programme

Mon 25 Nov, 6pm – Bocapa Open Mic for 16 Days

Music messages roll out from the very start of the programme, at the traditional Book Café Open Mic, where performing artists of every persuasion gather to participate in the longest running youth programme in Zimbabwe, from which many songs have been written, and many stars have been born.

Tue 26 Nov, 8pm – Kessia Masona & Jam Signal

Zimbabwean firecracker Kessia Masona is a lively champion for the cause in her Tuesday night series, tonight sharing the stage in a back-to-back afro-pop double-bill with hot new jazz kids on the block ‘Jam Signal’, who acquitted themselves well in the recent October World Music Festival.

Wed 27 Nov, 6pm – Free Film Screening “Peretera Maneta” (Spell My Name) by Tawanda Gunda Mupengo – A Zimbabwean short film, winner of UNESCO Children’s and Human Rights Award at Zanzibar International Film Festival 2006.  The film will followed by discussion.  Courtesy of Women Filmmakers of Zimbabwe as part of the 16 Days programme.

Thu 28 Nov, 5.30pm, Discussion: ‘From Peace In The Home To Peace In The World: Perspectives From Persons With Disabilities” – with Speakers: Radio presenter and gender activist Soneni Gwizi (Byo), Jennifer Shumba and Thabani Mpofu (lawyer).  Moderated by Admire Zaya.  Presented in collaboration with Signs of Hope Trust.  FREE, ALL WELCOME!

Fri 29, 8pm,            Diana Samkange who has been delighting Harare audiences and rising steadily in the past year, carries the 16 Days message in her own show this Friday, sharing the stage with the dynamic young entertainer Ba Shupi.

Sat 30, 2-7pm – Sistaz Open Mic Special: Best Of 2013

The final 2013 platform for the popular ‘Sistaz Open Mic’ this end-of-year special features some of the strongest women artists who have risen up through the platform during the year and have used their artistic gifts and talents to influence change.

Mon 02 Dec, 6pm – Book Cafe Open Mic for World Aids Day

Book Café Open Mic invites artists to commemorate the day and ‘shout out’ about HIV and Aids.  In the open mic format, anyone may appear and anything can happen!

Tue 03 Dec, 8pm – Kessia Masona is outspoken for peace in the world, tonight sharing the stage in a back-to-back fireball of lively entertainment with some of Zimbabwe’s most hilarious funny-men, Simuka Comedy!

Wed 04 Dec, 6pm, Free Film-screening: ‘Half The Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunities’ – A passionate call to arms, urging us not only to bear witness to the plight of the world’s women, but to help to transform their oppression into opportunity.  Courtesy of long-time 16 Days partner, Women Filmmakers of Zimbabwe.

Thu 05 Dec,            10am-4pm – Sistaz Open Mic Workshop – by invitation only.

Thu 05 Dec, 5.30pm – Gender Forum Discussion: “The Art(is)t Shaman: Sitting at the crossroads of the personal, the political, and the spiritual in Black Womben’s Art” – with Speakers d.bi Young (Jamaica/Canada), Mandisa Mabuthoe (Botswana) and Roxy ‘Xapa’ Mathazia (Zimbabwe), chaired by Cynthia ‘Flowchyld’ Marangwanda.  Free, All welcome!

Thu 05 Dec,            8pm – Edith weUtonga & Ammara Brown – Two of Zimbabwe’s popular women artists share the stage in back-to-back high-energy performances running with the 16 Days theme.

Fri 06 Dec, Poetry Workshop with visiting and local poets – By invitation only.

Sat 07            Dec, 2-5pm – The ‘House Of Hunger Poetry Slam’ employs poetry for human rights – this December turning the spotlight on the International Day (which falls on 10 December); featuring d’bi young alongside over 20 Zimbabwean and 3 visiting South African poets, Mandisa Vundla, Mpho Khosi and Rennie Ndwambi – come feel the energy!

Sat 07 Dec, 8pm – The Human Rights Day Concert:  A riveting performance by visiting dubpoet D’BI YOUNG (Jamaica/Canada), opening with ‘3 Generations’ featuring Dudu, Clare and Uza, backed by gifted Zimbabwean artists¸ and the campaign at Book Café closes with a grand final performance by acclaimed singer-songwriter Victor Kunonga (a.k.a the Peace Ambassador) and his backing band Peace.

BACKGROUND

PAMBERI TRUST is a Zimbabwean arts development organisation that is founded on the belief that the arts are critical in shaping values that reflect society.  Cognisant of the economic potential of the arts and the need to create free, diverse means of cultural expression; Pamberi Trust exists as an enabling facility, by which all performing artists and producers of culture may develop, promote and perform their works, and participate in building the nation.

Pamberi Trust’s gender project FLAME works to bring women artists into the mainstream of the arts in Zimbabwe.  It is the continuing aim of the FLAME project to provide women artists with opportunities for promotion, and – through these popular opinion leaders and new performance opportunities – to utilize the intersection between the arts and civil society for the promotion of peace and nation-building.

Peace-Building

Since 2007, FLAME has presented a series of events between 25 November and 10 December each year, joining the world in the international campaign ‘16 Days of Activism against Violence against Women’.

For 2013, the programme is supported by Hivos, Africalia, AST, Pro Helvetia, SDC, European Union and the Embassy of Canada.

A Full Embrace Excluding Nothing

peace by wade hudson

A Full Embrace Excluding Nothing
Finding Peace Within

Most people agree that a more peaceful world would be an ideal situation for all living creatures. However, we often seem stumped as to how to bring this ideal situation into being. If we are to have true peace in this world, each one of us must find it in ourselves first. If we don’t like ourselves, for example, we probably won’t like those around us. If we are in a constant state of inner conflict, then we will probably manifest conflict in the world. If we have fighting within our families, there can be no peace in the world. We must shine the light of inquiry on our internal struggles, because this is the only place we can really create change.

When we initiate the process of looking inside ourselves for the meaning of peace, we will begin to understand why it has always been so difficult to come by. This in itself will enable us to be compassionate toward the many people in the world who find themselves caught up in conflicts both personal and universal. We may have an experience of peace that we can call up in ourselves to remind us of what we want to create, but if we are human we will also feel the pull in the opposite direction—the desire to defend ourselves, to keep what we feel belongs to us, to protect our loved ones and our cherished ideals, and the anger we feel when threatened. This awareness is important because we cannot truly know peace until we understand the many tendencies and passions that threaten our ability to find it. Peace necessarily includes, even as it transcends, all of our primal energy, much of which has been expressed in ways that contradict peace.

Being at peace with ourselves is not about denying or rejecting any part of ourselves. On the contrary, in order to be at peace we must be willing and able to hold ourselves, in all our complexity, in a full embrace that excludes nothing. This is perhaps the most difficult part for many of us, because we want so much to disown the negative aspects of our humanity. Ironically, though, true peace begins with a willingness to take responsibility for our humanity so that we might ultimately transform it in the light of our love.

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